Facts and Information

Here find facts and information related to wild salmon restoration and the support for removal of the four Lower Snake River dams.


This page contains a series of documents that provide additional detailed information on a range of topics concerning wild salmon and steelhead population status and restoration activities, Southern Resident Orcas, Columbia and Snake river conditions and management regimes and options, dam removal, commercial transportation, energy replacement, and more.

Additional information and resources can be found under each SOS Project in the form of media stories, guest opinions, news releases, reports, etc. If you have questions about these documents or topics, or others that aren’t listed below, please contact Joseph Bogaard at joseph@wildsalmon.org // 206-300-1003

(1) SCIENCE:

-- A. Salmon Science incl. lower Snake River dam removal, spill, barging, etc:

  • Scientists Letter to Congress re: the benefits of expanded spill on the survival of juvenile salmon and steelhead in the Columbia-Snake River Basin (2017) PDF
  • Snake River Salmon and Steelhead Returns: 2015 - 2017 (Oct. 2017)  PDF
  • Comparative Survival Study of Pit-tagged of Spring/Summer/Fall Chinook, Summer Steelhead and Sockeye (CSS Oversight Committee and Fish Passage Center, 2017) PDF
  • Wild Pacific Salmon: An Threatened Legacy (Williams, Lichatowich et al, 2017) PDF
  • Why spill? Because the situation is dire - Ten slides on outlining spill science and benefits (2017)  PDF
  • Map: Smolt-to-Adult Ratio (SAR) for the Columbia-Snake River Basin (2017) PDF
  • Idaho Conservation Organizations Letter to NOAA-Fisheries re: artificial fish transportation (barging) and harmful effects on sockeye survival and recovery (2017)  PDF
  • Factsheet: The Salmon Community’s View: The status of wild salmon and steelhead populations in the Columbia and Snake River Basin (2016)  PDF
  • Fish Passage Center Memo: Data Request Regarding Drawing Down Lower Granite Reservoir to Better Meet Water Quality Standards for Temperature (2016)  PDF
  • Spill and Total Dissolved Gas (TDG) science presented in two summary slides (2016)  PDF
  • Fish Passage Center Memo: Preliminary 2015 juvenile survival estimates and environmental conditions (2016)  PDF
  • SOS Report: Learning from the Fish – The biological effects of BPA management, including its wind power curtailments, on ocean-bound Columbia and Snake River salmon in 2011 (2011)  PDF
  • Resolution of the Western Division of the American Fisheries Society on the Role of Dams and Conservation of Snake River Salmon, Steelhead, Pacific Lamprey, and White Sturgeon (2011)  PDF
  • Fish Passage Center Memo: Benefits of spill for juvenile fish passage at hydroelectric projects (2011)  PDF
  • Factsheet: Dams catch more salmon than fishermen (2007)  PDF
  • Graph: Columbia Basin Salmon Harvest 1866 - 2011 (2013)  JPG
  • Fish Passage Center - An excellent source of science documents, articles and memos re: Columbia-Snake River Basin salmon and steelhead survival.

-- B. Southern Resident Orca:

  • Puget Sound Partnership Resolution 2017-01: Accelerating and amplifying chinook salmon recovery for Southern Resident Killer Whales (Nov. 2017)  PDF
  • PLOS 1: Population growth is limited by nutritional impacts on pregnancy success in endangered Southern Resident killer whales (Wasser et al, 2017)  PDF
  • Factsheet: Why Southern Resident Orcas are Malnourished (2016)  PDF
  • Orca Scientists Letter to Senator Patty Murray re: Recovering Federally Endangered Killer Whales by Breaching the Four Lower Snake River Dams  (2015)  PDF
  • Orca Salmon Alliance Factsheet: Save the Salmon, Save the Whales (2015)  PDF
  • Businesses and Scientists Sign-on Letter to Governor Inslee re: Southern Resident Killer Whales (2014)  PDF
  • Assessing the coastal occurrence of endangered killer whales using autonomous passive acoustic recorders (J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 2013)  PDF
  • Species and stock identification of scale/tissue samples from southern resident killer whale predation events collected off the Washington coast during PODs 2009 cruise on the McArthur II (Hanson et al, unpublished, 2010)  PDF
  • Orca Scientists Letter to NOAA Regional Administrator Bob Lohn re: Recovering Federally Endangered Killer Whales by Breaching the Four Lower Snake River Dams (2007)  PDF

-- C. Climate Change

  • Columbia Riverkeeper White Paper: Computer modeling shows that Lower Snake River dams caused dangerously hot water for salmon in 2015.  (Shultz and Johnson, 2017)  PDF
  • EPA Powerpoint Presentation: Temperature Model of the Snake River (2017)  PDF
  • Fish Passage Center Memo: The effect of warm water on upstream steelhead passage (2016) PDF
  • Fish Passage Center Memo: Requested data summaries regarding summer Chinook adult fish passage and water temperature in the Columbia and Snake River (2016)  PDF
  • NOAA Report: Impacts of Climate Change on Salmon of the Pacific Northwest (Crozier, 2016)  PDF
  • Scientists Letter to NOAA-Fisheries re: Climate Change and Columbia Basin salmon (2015)  PDF
  • Fish Passage Center Memo: Requested data summaries and actions regarding sockeye adult fish passage and water temperature issues in the Columbia and Snake rivers.  (2015)  PDF
  • Letter to Northwest Power and Conservation Council re: expanded spill and greenhouse gas emissions (SOS and NW Energy Coalition, 2014)  PDF
  • Fish Passage Center Memo: Response to request – Review BPA SMART Spill PowerPoint Presentation (2013)  PDF
  • A Great Wave Rising: Solutions for Columbia and Snake Salmon in the Age of Climate Change (Martin and Glick, 2013) PDF
  • Bright Future: How to keep the Northwest’s lights on, jobs growing, goods moving and salmon swimming in the era of climate change (NWEC, 2009)  PDF
  • Bright Future Excerpts – page 1, 4 (NWEC, 2009)  PDF

(2) ECONOMICS OF DAMS, DAM REMOVAL, ECOSYSTEM BENEFITS, AND MORE:

  • Report: The Value of Natural Capital in the Columbia River Basin – a Comprehensive Analysis (Earth Economics, 2017)  PDF
  • Brochure: The Value of Natural Capital in the Columbia River Basin – a Comprehensive Analysis (Earth Economics, 2017)  PDF
  • FAQ for the Value of Natural Capital in the Columbia River Basin – A Comprehensive Analysis (Earth Economics, 2017)  PDF
  • National and Regional Economic Analysis of the Four Lower Snake River Dams – A review of the 2002 Lower Snake Feasibility Report/Environmental Impact Statement Economic Appendix (Earth Economics, 2016)  PDF
  • Dam Removal: Case Studies on the Fiscal, Economic, Social, and Environmental Benefits of Dam Removal (Headwaters Economics, 2016)  PDF
  • Executive Summary: Dam Removal Case Studies on the Fiscal, Economic, Social, and Environmental Benefits of Dam Removal (Headwaters Economics, October 2016)  PDF
  • The Costs of Keeping the Four Lower Snake River Dams: A Reevaluation of the Lower Snake River Feasibility Report (James Waddell, 2015)  PDF
  • Lower Snake River Navigation Study (Rocky Mountain Econometrics, 2015)  PDF
  • Graph: Lower Snake River Freight Traffic at Ice Harbor Dam – 1995-2015  PDF
  • Factsheet: The Five Most Blatant Myths about Freight Transportation on the Lower Snake River (2013)  PDF
  • Factsheet: It Costs to Have a Port (2014)  PDF
  • Factsheet: Myths and Facts about lower Snake River dam removal (SOS, 2014)  PDF
  • Report: Revenue Stream: An economic analysis of the costs and benefits of removing the four dams on the lower Snake River (2013)  PDF
  • Factsheet: Freight Transport on the Lower Snake River: Putting Total Tonnage and Ton-miles in Perspective (2013)  PDF

(3) ENERGY REPLACEMENT OF THE LOWER SNAKE RIVER DAMS:

  • Restoring wild salmon – Power system costs and benefits of lower Snake River dam removal (NW Energy Coalition, 2015)  PDF
  • Lower Snake River Alternative Power Costs (Rocky Mountain Econometrics, 2015)  PDF
  • Factsheet: Columbia Basin Dams, Salmon and Clean Energy (SOS, 2014)  PDF

(4) U.S. CONGRESS, FEDERAL AGENCIES, GOVERNORS AND OTHER POLICYMAKERS:

  • NGO Sign-on letter to Governor Jay Inslee (WA) urging increased 'spill' to help endangered salmon and orca (Nov. 2017) PDF
  • NGO Sign-on letter to Northwest members of Congress re: HR 3144 (2017)  PDF
  • SOS-Earthjustice Factsheet: HR 3144 (2017)  PDF
  • HR 3144 – bill language (2017)  PDF
  • HR 3144 select materials from House Natural Resources Subcommittee for Water, Energy and Oceans hearing (Oct. 2017)
    • Nez Perce Tribe comments  PDF
    • Save Our wild Salmon comments  PDF
    • Alaska Trollers Association comments  PDF
    • National Wildlife Federation comments  PDF
    • Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association testimony  PDF
    • Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen's Associations comments  PDF
    • Orca Salmon Alliance comments  PDF
    • Coastal Trollers Association comments  PDF
    • NW Energy Coalition comments  PDF

(5) FEDERAL COURT:

  • Visit this page for links to recent court decisions, related fact sheets and media coverage (2016)

(6) NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) REVIEW:

  • Visit this page for a summary of public comments, links to many detailed policy comments re: the NEPA Review Scoping Period  (Oct. 2016 – Feb. 2017)
  • NWEC Factsheet: Considering all options, including a clean, affordable, renewable energy solution for the lower Snake River (2017) PDF

 

Resolution of the Western Division of the American Fisheries Society on the Role of Dams and Conservation of Snake River Salmon, Steelhead, Pacific Lamprey, and White Sturgeon

Download as a pdf.

wdafs.logoWhereas the first objective in the constitution of the American Fisheries Society is to promote the conservation, development, and wise use of fisheries, and the American Fisheries Society further commits to promote enlightened management of aquatic resources for optimum use and enjoyment by the public; and

Whereas past management of Snake River salmon, steelhead, Pacific lamprey, and white sturgeon populations and their environment has resulted in a failure to conserve and use wisely the fisheries, or to provide for optimum use and enjoyment by the public; and

Whereas Snake River salmon, steelhead, Pacific lamprey, and white sturgeon extinctions and declines occurred as a result of the impacts from a variety of physical, chemical, and biological factors, including climate change and ocean regime shifts plus those that have been summarized as the “four H’s” - Hatcheries, Harvest, Habitat, and Hydropower; and

Rail and highway investing will benefit farmers, fishermen and communities throughout the Northwest

blue_mt_foothillsWith the right investments we can transport grain and other goods efficiently and affordably without the lower Snake River barge corridor.

Investing in modern rail and highway investments can provide a transportation system that meets the needs of eastern Washington wheat farmers, gives the Inland Northwest a competitive edge in attracting new businesses, and allows for the recovery of wild salmon to self-sustaining, harvestable numbers.

Save Our Wild Salmon along with coalition partner groups have engaged in a constructive dialogue with farmers to explore ways we can keep farmers farming and fishermen fishing, including discussing transportation options that can make lower Snake River barging unnecessary.

The Elwha River: A Case Study in Success

elwhadambigAmerica’s largest current dam removal project has lessons for restoring a free-flowing Snake River

Beginning in 2011, our nation will begin its biggest dam removal project yet. Two large dams on Washington State’s Olympic peninsula have blocked a river and destroyed a once thriving fishery that included chinook salmon in excess of 100 pounds.

A free-flowing Elwha river will re-connect wild salmon and steelhead with more than 70 miles of ancestral habitat – much of it in the pristine lands of the Olympic National Park. In doing so, it will restore healthy fisheries, create long-term jobs, and increase tourism and outdoor recreation opportunities.

Science and law disregarded in 2010 Obama Salmon Plan for Columbia and Snake Rivers

science-labMarch 11, 2011: Scientists respond to NOAA Administrator Dr. Lubchenco in the Oregonian - Saving Columbia River salmon: Going where the 'best available science' leads us.

October 29th, 2010

A broad coalition of salmon advocates, along with the State of Oregon and Nez Perce Tribe, have asked Federal Judge James Redden to declare President Obama’s Columbia and Snake river salmon recovery plan illegal. More on that court filing here.

On May 20, 2010, the Obama administration decided to adopt, with only minor tweaks, the Bush administration’s much-criticized Columbia River salmon plan, despite many chances to make real changes and repeated calls from scientists, courts, lawmakers, and regional stakeholders to take a different path.  This plan could weaken protections for endangered species across the nation and rolls back in-river protections put in place by the federal court since 2006.  Nonetheless, Dr. Jane Lubchenco, NOAA Administrator and nationally renowned scientist, has stated that she stands “100 percent” behind the science in this plan.  However, scientific documents obtained through the court, and in the administrative record of the ongoing legal battle surrounding this issue, illustrate that science took a back seat to regional politics in this decision.

Check out statements below from scientists on Obama's plan.

Download this page as a pdf.

Tar Sands Update: Calling on Northwest lawmakers

loggingtruck.tarsands

On September 22, forty-two conservation, fishing, clean energy and outdoor organizations from across the Pacific Northwest delivered letters to the members of congress in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Montana.

The organizations express grave concerns about the potential impacts and risks to our communities, businesses, and environment if Exxon’s is successful in establishing a brand-new “high and wide” mega-industrial transportation corridor through the heart of the Pacific Northwest.

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