Light in the River - climate solutions for the Columbia and Snake Rivers

 

litr.logo"Light from the river illuminates our homes. But let us also remember and honor the light in the river."  - Don Sampson, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation

Salmon are the light in our rivers. In partial return for earth’s blessings, we must keep that light shining.

Salmon are a beacon to guide us through climate disruption. If any species can show us the way through this human-caused crisis, it is these adaptive masters.

LTR thermometerTwo further convictions guide this program:

Halting climate change and adapting to it are reciprocal challenges, connected by permeable membranes. Actions by individuals, businesses, and governments that address only one side of the challenge are likely to fail.

Climate change is dissolving boundaries between issues, interests and parties. A program to help salmon through climate upheaval cannot focus solely on salmon. An agency seeking to tackle climate change cannot do so solely within its statutory or constituency bounds.

Learn more about our two Light in the River reports: A Great Wave Rising and Bright Future, and our 2013 climate priorities.

 

 

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 Summer 2013 – Hot Water Alert No. 7

70 Degrees Or More For 24-45 Straight Days in the Columbia and Snake Rivers

Memo to Northwest writers, reporters, editorialists, and columnists

As of September 1, river temperatures at all four lower Columbia River dams have been 70 degrees or above for 24 straight days. At the middle two of those dams – The Dalles and John Day – it’s been 39 straight days. At Ice Harbor Dam, the Snake River dam closest to the Columbia, it’s been 45 straight days.

The story is monotonous - and somber. Together the four lower Snake and four lower Columbia dams impound about 400 consecutive miles of river. Total 2013 readings of 70 degrees or more in these 400 miles are now nearly triple the number in 2012. Last year, the great bulk of 70-plus readings were in August. This year, 70-plus readings began in mid-July and have now stretched continuously into September.

This week’s specifics:

Forebay (above dam) Tailrace (below dam)

Bonneville Dam
Aug 26     71.2 F     71.2 F
Aug 27     71.1 F     71.2 F
Aug 28     71.5 F     71.5 F
Aug 29     71.7 F     71.8 F
Aug 30     72 F        72 F
Aug 31     72.3 F     72.3 F
Sept 1      72.3 F     72.3 F

Read more...

 

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Summer 2013 – Hot Water Alert No. 6

Highest river temperature of 2013 – 72.7 F at John Day Dam

Memo to Northwest writers, reporters, editorialists, and columnists – Aug. 27, 2013

At week’s end, August 25, river temperatures at John Day Dam have been above 72 degrees five straight days, and on August 22 reached 72.7 degrees, the highest reading of 2013. Temperatures at The Dalles and John Day Dams have been 70 F or higher for 32 straight days, and above 70 F at all four mainstem Columbia dams 17 straight days. At Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River, temperatures have been above 70 F for 38 straight days. These month-long hot water temperatures are disrupting salmon and steelhead migrations. This week’s specifics: 

Forebay reading (above dam), followed by Tailrace reading (below dam) 

Bonneville Dam
Aug 19    71.8 F     71.9 F
Aug 20    71.6 F     71.6 F
Aug 21    71.4 F     71.5 F
Aug 22    71.4 F     71.4 F
Aug 23    71.3 F     71.3 F
Aug 24    71.4 F     71.4 F
Aug 25    71.4 F     71.3 F

Read more...

 

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Memo to Northwest writers, reporters, editorialists, and columnists – Aug. 21, 2013
 
Summer 2013 – Hot Water Alert No. 5
Columbia River temperatures over 70 degrees continue

From August 12 through 18, water temperatures were 70 degrees or higher 63 times at Columbia and Snake River federal dams passable to salmon, up from 56 times last week. Temperatures at The Dalles and John Day Dams have been 70 F or higher 25 straight days, and have been above 70 F at all four main-stem Columbia dams for 10 straight days.  At Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River, temperatures have been above 70 F 31 straight days – a full month.  On August 17, temperatures at The Dalles and John Day Dams hit 72 F, the highest reading so far this summer.  

Total daily exceedances for the summer are nearing 200.   This week’s specifics:
 
Forebay (above dam) Tailrace (below dam)

Bonneville Dam     
Aug 12    71.2 F     71.3 F
Aug 13    71.3 F     71.3 F
Aug 14    71.3 F     71.4 F
Aug 15    71.4 F     71.4 F
Aug 16    71.6 F     71.6 F
Aug 17    71.8 F     71.9 F
Aug 18    71.8 F     71.8 F

Read more...

 

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Memo to Northwest writers, reporters, editorialists, and columnists – Aug. 15, 2013
 
Summer 2013 – Hot Water Alert No. 4
Columbia River temperatures over 70 degrees increase

From August 5 through 11, water temperatures were 70 degrees or higher 56 times at Columbia and Snake River federal dams passable to salmon, up from 45 times last week. Temperatures at The Dalles and John Day Dams have been 70 F or higher 18 straight days, and at week’s end temperatures were above 70 F at all four mainstem Columbia dams. At Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River, temperatures have been above 70 F for 24 straight days. Total daily exceedances this summer have climbed well past the total number last summer.

This week’s specifics:

Forebay (above dam) Tailrace (below dam)

Bonneville Dam      
Aug 5    70.9 F    70.9 F
Aug 6    71.6 F    71.5 F
Aug 7    71.7 F    71.7 F
Aug 8    71.5 F    71.6 F
Aug 9    71.1 F    71.1 F
Aug 10  71.2 F    71.2 F
Aug 11  71.2 F    71.2 F

The Dalles Dam
Aug 5    71.7 F    71.7 F
Aug 6    71.6 F    71.8 F
Aug 7    71.3 F    71.4 F
Aug 8    70.9 F    71.1 F
Aug 9    71.3 F    71.3 F
Aug 10  71.4 F    71.5 F
Aug 11  71.4 F    71.5 F

Read more...

 

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Summer 2013 - Hot Water Alert No. 3

Columbia and Snake River temperatures over 70 degrees for third straight week

Memo to Northwest writers, reporters, editorialists, and columnists – August 7, 2013

For the week July 29 through August 4, water temperatures were 70 degrees or higher 45 times at Columbia and Snake River federal dams passable to salmon – up from 35 readings the previous week.

At three dams – The Dalles and John Day on the Columbia, and Ice Harbor on the Snake – temperatures were above 70 degrees all seven days both above and below the dams. At Ice Harbor Dam, temperatures have now been above 70 degrees for 17 consecutive days; at The Dalles and John Day, for 11 consecutive days.

The Dalles Dam (first reading = forebay/above dam; second reading = tailrace/below dam)         
July 29       70.1 F            70.2 F
July 30       70.7 F            70.7 F
July 31       70.8 F            70.9 F
Aug 1         70.6 F             70.8 F
Aug 2         70.1 F             70.3 F
Aug 3         70.2 F             70.2 F
Aug 4         71.1 F             71.1 F

Read more...

 

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Summer 2013 – Hot water alert No. 2

Columbia and Snake River temperatures regularly exceed 70 degrees

Memo to Northwest writers, reporters, editorialists and columnists - July 30, 2013

 For the week July 22-28, water temperatures were 70 degrees F or higher 35 times at four federal dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers passable to salmon. All readings at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River surpassed 70 degrees during this week, and readings at The Dalles Dam surpassed 70 degrees July 24-28:



ICE HARBOR DAM:


July 22 forebay (above dam)   70.6 F tailrace (below dam) 71 F

July 23 forebay   70.7 F tailrace   71.5 F


July 24 forebay   71.1 F tailrace   71.5 F

July 25 forebay   71.1 F tailrace   71.5 F

July 26 forebay   71.1 F tailrace   71.5 F

July 27 forebay   71.1 F tailrace   71.5 F

July 28 forebay   71.1 F tailrace   71.2 F

Read more...

Save Our wild Salmon is a diverse, nationwide coalition working together to restore wild salmon and steelhead to the rivers, streams and marine waters of the Pacific Northwest for the benefit of our region's ecology, economy and culture.

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